Archive for the ‘Global Criminals’ Category

I fly a lot

I am a frequent flyer. Usually short-haul. Naturally, like many of my contemporaries, the news of the loss of the German Wings Airbus A320 over the Alps en route to Düsseldorf from Barcelona, was shocking. There was an horrendous loss of life on board, each with grieving families and friends.

image001.jpgWe now know that the crash was no accident. The First Officer, Andreas Lubitz, deliberately and consciously crashed the plane. We find that those doors that are always locked in order to protect us from the enemy without are no protection from the enemy within; namely those in the cockpit. Lubitz, it seems, was a privileged white man from a well-to-do family living in a quiet rural town conveniently connected to Frankfurt with a high-speed rail link. His father was a banker.

Lubitz perhaps saw his privilege slipping away. His poor mental health, seemingly, did not disqualify him from flying commercial aircraft. And the culpability of Lufthansa, the parent company of German Wings, is significant. People in Lufthansa knew that he was a risk.

Lubitz murdered 149 people.

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Goran Hadžić

Picked up – the final of the wanted by the International Criminal Court from the Yugoslav conflict. http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/aug/03/former-yugoslavia-war-crimes-hunt

Global Criminals

23 June 2011

Another one off the list. James J. Bulger picked up yesterday. He’s 81 years old. (See entry 29 May.)

Maybe now there is room on the wanted list for some bankers?

12 June 2011

How interesting and coincidental. My Global Criminals section a couple of weeks ago reported 7 Africans wanted by Interpol. Yesterday, Fazul Abdullah Mohammed, wanted for his alledged involvement in the Nairobi and Dar es Salaam embassy bombings has been allegedly killed by Kenyan authorities. Oddly, Fazul Abdullah Mohammed, was not on the list.

29 May 2011

The time came for the authorities to pick up Ratko Mladić; seemingly no point in sheltering him any longer. Off to The Hague to join  Milošević and Karadžić. Osama bin Laden’s time also came, though no Hague court for him, oddly. The picture of Barack Obama (right) watching the execution along with his aides and Hilary Clinton will become iconic for its surrealism. There was a $25 million reward for information leading to his apprehension.

Who’s left? The FBI website still has Bin Laden on its top ten list (though with a red banner supporting the word ‘deceased’). The other nine are petty by comparison worth each a paltry $100k with the exception of James J. Bulger worth $2m with 19 counts of murder to account for. Interpol has 7 Africans from Sudan, Congo and Uganda on its recent list wanted for crimes against humanity. There are still 7 sought for the Rwandan genocide. And with Mladić in custody, the Balkan’s most wanted is Goran Hadžić, wanted for 14 counts of war crimes, most infamously, the 1991 Vukovar massacre of 250 people.

Crimes against humanity are incomparable. That said, crimes against the global economy ought to attract the attention of the International Criminal Court. Some of the accused might be easy to pick up as most are regularly advising Barack Obama on economic policy or sit in Ivy League universities in the US. I recommend readers to view Charles Ferguson’s documentary film, ‘Inside Job’ to view the evidence. It’s also worth looking at Adam Curtis’s latest documentary ‘All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace’ to see just how indictable some of the bankers and politicians are.