Archive for the ‘Travel’ Category

Camel Do Your Thing wtf

Camel’s Do Your Thing campaign reappeared last week in Munich with this gem. In the left panel a couple demonstrate two Camel packets, conveniently limiting exposure of the nasty death/chronic disease images that cigarette packets must legally display. On the right is the couple being tossers. That’s about it really.

German cigarette advertising update – early summer 2017

Not a huge amount to report on the cigarette company campaigns. No attractive young people having their lives ruined. Not consciously, at least. That said, one cannot get over the sheer cleverness of the campaign managers with their slogans. Take Lucky Strike, for example. Urlaub Eingereicht – holiday secured, if my translation works. Cause for celebration and anticipation? Hold on. Am 1. Arbeitstag. Not so good. A working holiday, maybe? At least we have Luck Strike. The hashtags seem to refer to the taste of the cigarette – icecold and, for want of a better word, persistent?

Then there is Jeanshemd Getragen. Zur Jeanshose (right). I think for this one, it is too subtle for me. Literally Demin shirt worn. To Jeans trousers. Double denim or long shirt not needing trousers? Whatever it means, the product is deadly, icecold or not.

Finally, JPS are sticking with the big packs. 10 Euros gets you 39 cigarettes in a megadeath box. Sorry, megabox.

Vive Le Moment goes big-time summer stupid

Are you 20 something and a bit warm? Do you live too far away from the beach or pool? Why not compensate by filling up the back of a pick-up truck with water and then jump into it with your clothes on with three equally motivated souls? Vive le Moment.

Next, are you in a really good mood and also have a cool scooter that you want to trash by attempting to ride it in a squat position on the beach with your mate standing up behind you? Albeit with a crash helmet on. (Is that required in France?). Might you do this because there is are some storm clouds in the distance? Good. Vive Le Moment.

Camel and white nationalism?

Camel’s Do Your Thing campaign is back. Apologies about the picture, but a sunny day and poster is stuck behind plastic. Not great for photography.

The approach is the same, however. Person with attitude looks to camera to say, “look at me, I don’t care about your or me, for that matter”. Curious approach to promoting the brand. What always seemed to me to express some kind of exoticism now seems to promote white nationalism!

Gauloises cashing in on the summer

It’s festival time! Break out the cancer sticks of choice: namely Gauloises. So, the latest in the long-running Vive campaign – 3-day festival, 2 nights in a tent, and a moment of freedom.

A few questions, if it is real freedom, why are the bearded men showering in their clothes? Are they shy? Actually, looking at it again, perhaps it’s raining – they are showering in the rain? The two be-tented people looking on seem to be have a great time watching a couple of tossers. Whatever the situation, they need to enjoy their moment of freedom. With Gauloises, be rest-assured, it won’t last.

Grandaddy – finally

I am a little bit too late sometimes to the party. Somewhere I heard that Grandaddy had sort-of reformed and were doing some shows. Into the ether I went, discovered that they were playing in Brighton, UK, and tried to buy tickets. Sold out. Next option, Brussels’ Ancienne Belgique, 5 April. It seemed like a good idea at the time.

And what did I know about Grandaddy? Well, eventually I made the link between Jason Lytle – whose solo album, The Department of Disappearance (right) I’d bought a few years’ earlier – and Grandaddy. Lytle has a distinctive voice, so it did not take much to make the connection once heard. And I’m a sucker for lumberjack shirts.

I’ve also got into the frame of mind that I missed too many good gigs when I was younger thinking that there would always be another chance. I’m not so sure now. Hence the nonsense of going to Brussels.

So, in preparation for the gig, I bought the new album, Last Place, which the Guardian newspaper described as “solid rather than spectacular”. Apparently, I should have bought the first two albums, these were the dizzy heights. At the gig, I suspect Lytle himself recognised this and played extensively from them. A greying, largely male, audience was appreciative of this. It was anything but a sales push on Last Place.

That said, there are a number of tracks which, I suspect, Lytle himself regards as up to the mark. Much of it is disconcerting. So, I don’t wanna live here any more has the preceding line, “I’ve just moved here”. Seemingly autobiographical – Lytle moved from Montana to Oregon (in the Trumpian world, both sound places to avoid) and perhaps regretted it. Many of us have had that feeling, at least between houses if not states. Keeping up the melancholy, This is the Part a journey to Oregon living maybe? “This is the part, Some call a broken heart; Put down the phone, There’s no one coming home.” Ah yes, this is 2000s world where there are still landline phones. The backdrop for the band on stage is a film depicting this world full of freight trains, trucks, cement factories and a lot of wilderness.

Let’s go upbeat? The Way We Won’t is that pop song. Trademark melody, synth and guitar. The accompanying video, however, has a twist. Lyrically, I’m baffled. Maybe it is culturally too far away from me? “Less than an hour past control tower, On a big box store roof; Cinnamon smell and holiday sales, Why would we ever move?” Oh, I don’t know. I could find a reason.

The gig, wonderful. Lytle’s voice is not the strongest and it needed a bit more amplification. He’s also not the most charismatic on stage and did not even introduce the band members apart from Shaun who’d stood in at last minute on guitar (photo top left, far left).

JPS does blue

I’m back in Germany for the first time in a month. I was not sure what I would find on the cigarette advertising front. Dominant at the moment seems to be JPS’s push into blue (a common colour used by e-cigarette manufacturers and mellow brands). The strapline says something like “enjoy without compromise”. Reading between the lines, does that mean it is not actually as good a proper killer cigarettes? This guy has a fantastic smokers’ cough! “Funky taste of dirt and hay”, he says. Twice. Whilst this review is priceless. I suspect he is not going to review cigarettes for a living any time soon. In fact, JPS have probably had a word with him already. Or at the very least given him a few packets of more potent “coffin sticks” to see  him off quicker.

I note that the current advertising approach where packets are the focus, the camera is angled to avoid the nasty graphic the manufacturers have to put on the front these days. This leaves the important branding visible. Still outrageous to see on street advertising.

 

JPS does brash

Back in Munich, I find cigarette advertising in rude health. JSP is back, relinquishing beautiful people and men with spanners, in favour of a brash 40 per packet, just to help the chronic disease on a little bit.  “Outside large, inside awesome” goes the modest strapline. I think it is time for a return to cigarette cases – decanting a few from the packet to avoid looking like a desperate smoker.

Enjoy the Moment – the best advice ever from a cigarette firm

wp-1487537190825.jpgThere has been a recent addition to the Pall Mall Enjoy the Moment campaign. Here we find two women, one with a cigarette, and a man giving the smoking woman a piggyback ride. The strapline “schon nach Hause” translates literally as “already at home”; naturally we enjoy the moment.

 

JPS’s men with spanners

wp-1487537265635.jpgBy goodness, the cigarette manufacturers do seem to like Hamburg as a city to market their lethal products. JPS (left), for example, occupies many of those smaller lit poster sites (bus shelters, etc.). What do we have here? Huge Plans. Enjoyable details. Presumably, let’s get that bolt sorted and we can go even faster on those infamous German autobahns. Better to die instantly now doing what we like rather than later with the inevitable chronic lung disease?