Archive for the ‘Cigarette advertising’ Category

Camel and white nationalism?

Camel’s Do Your Thing campaign is back. Apologies about the picture, but a sunny day and poster is stuck behind plastic. Not great for photography.

The approach is the same, however. Person with attitude looks to camera to say, “look at me, I don’t care about your or me, for that matter”. Curious approach to promoting the brand. What always seemed to me to express some kind of exoticism now seems to promote white nationalism!

Gauloises cashing in on the summer

It’s festival time! Break out the cancer sticks of choice: namely Gauloises. So, the latest in the long-running Vive campaign – 3-day festival, 2 nights in a tent, and a moment of freedom.

A few questions, if it is real freedom, why are the bearded men showering in their clothes? Are they shy? Actually, looking at it again, perhaps it’s raining – they are showering in the rain? The two be-tented people looking on seem to be have a great time watching a couple of tossers. Whatever the situation, they need to enjoy their moment of freedom. With Gauloises, be rest-assured, it won’t last.

JPS does blue

I’m back in Germany for the first time in a month. I was not sure what I would find on the cigarette advertising front. Dominant at the moment seems to be JPS’s push into blue (a common colour used by e-cigarette manufacturers and mellow brands). The strapline says something like “enjoy without compromise”. Reading between the lines, does that mean it is not actually as good a proper killer cigarettes? This guy has a fantastic smokers’ cough! “Funky taste of dirt and hay”, he says. Twice. Whilst this review is priceless. I suspect he is not going to review cigarettes for a living any time soon. In fact, JPS have probably had a word with him already. Or at the very least given him a few packets of more potent “coffin sticks” to see  him off quicker.

I note that the current advertising approach where packets are the focus, the camera is angled to avoid the nasty graphic the manufacturers have to put on the front these days. This leaves the important branding visible. Still outrageous to see on street advertising.

 

JPS does brash

Back in Munich, I find cigarette advertising in rude health. JSP is back, relinquishing beautiful people and men with spanners, in favour of a brash 40 per packet, just to help the chronic disease on a little bit.  “Outside large, inside awesome” goes the modest strapline. I think it is time for a return to cigarette cases – decanting a few from the packet to avoid looking like a desperate smoker.

Enjoy the Moment – the best advice ever from a cigarette firm

wp-1487537190825.jpgThere has been a recent addition to the Pall Mall Enjoy the Moment campaign. Here we find two women, one with a cigarette, and a man giving the smoking woman a piggyback ride. The strapline “schon nach Hause” translates literally as “already at home”; naturally we enjoy the moment.

 

JPS’s men with spanners

wp-1487537265635.jpgBy goodness, the cigarette manufacturers do seem to like Hamburg as a city to market their lethal products. JPS (left), for example, occupies many of those smaller lit poster sites (bus shelters, etc.). What do we have here? Huge Plans. Enjoyable details. Presumably, let’s get that bolt sorted and we can go even faster on those infamous German autobahns. Better to die instantly now doing what we like rather than later with the inevitable chronic lung disease?

Pall Mall first with 2017 billboards in Germany

I arrived in Munich last night to the delights of Pawp-1484397608333.jpgll Mall’s new campaign. The strap line is Enjoy the Moment. There are two posters doing the rounds – one of men (left) the other featuring a women and a man.

So, the scenario for the first one (left) is that the bloke on the left has lost a bet. The forfeit, however, is not what one might expect for a smoker, his life; rather the minor issue of his beard. I trust that his life ends in due course with ghastly lung wp-1484511849566.jpgdisease.

The second one sees a woman in the foreground and a man in the background enjoying the rain (Pall Mall has a thing about women getting wet while smoking). “Schiet Wetter” goes the strapline (I think we can all translate that). Enjoy the moment. Two things I enjoy not very much. Being wet and cigarette smoke, other  people’s,naturally.

Gauloises does carefree dancing in the street

So, Gauloises is rehashing some of wp-1481460345591.jpgthe imagery of its Vive le Moment advertising campaign. New taglines. I have seen a newer version of the women with moustaches on railway stations without having the option of taking a photo. But the young couple dancing in the street is completely new to me. What is going on here? Tagline is “Old Love, rejoined, new fire”. Erm….ok. So, young couple break up and get back together again with new energy, hence the dancing in the street. Enjoy the moment, for sure.

What I am confused about here is the law on advertising in Germany. In my previous post on the subject, it was clear that negative images of the effects of smoking were explicit with the foetus in the ashtray. But here, with the exception of the small black writing at the bottom “smoking is deadly” (upgraded from “smoking can be deadly”), all is idyllic.

Luckies hoping we do not notice?

wp-1480279623909.jpgI suppose that when the UK leaves the EU and Nigel Farage becomes PM at the behest of the US President, then cigarette advertising will be back on the streets of the UK as they are in Germany. The run up to Christmas is not the best time to see this particular species of advertising, but the Lucky Strike – Luckies – brand is loitering in U-Bahn Stations in Munich (left).

What is interesting about this one, notwithstanding its lack of imagination – good deal and thick, if my translation is up to it – is that it is forced to show something nasty on the front. Inside the black band on the packet is an ashtray with the ash forming the shape of a foetus. This is the first time that I have seen this on street posters. It raises the question as to whether the advertisers could have avoided this by not showing the packet? If they are able to do so, then this is an even more stupid billboard than I had first thought. If they cannot, how is the negative image going to be represeted on more alluring advertising such as that practised by Marlboro, Camel and Gauloises? I trust the answer will come like the answer to plenty of other potentially lethal questions (Trump, le Pen, Wilders) in the much-anticipated 2017!

Three killers together

download_20160905_231947The three killer brands appear on the same billboard – Marlboro, L&M and Chesterfield. To what end?

Seemingly, they will now have the same box but with similar numbers of sticks. I assume this is something to do with European packaging regulations where two-thirds of the pack have to show the lethal side of the product rather than the brand. I need to check the packets in the shop.